Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘printing’

28
Jan
cmyk

RGB vs CMYK

“Could we print the brochure in RGB? You know, it would be cheaper if we use one color less…”

To those who are unfamiliar with the world of printing; offset and digital printing requires 4 basic colors to make up the wide range of colors that are represented in the natural world: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black. Read more »

24
Nov

Command Something New

AthmostheoryGuess what I found today? Atmostheory! I have always enjoyed scouring the web and coming across something new and extremely creative. These posters are nothing overly complex but the idea behind them are amazing. Most people work a lifetime to create something truly original. Which is your favorite?

Commands

Available for purchase at My Little Underground. Throw a little love to the original artist.

20
Nov
cmyk

Common Misconceptions in Graphic Design and Printing

“Why does it always look different on my screen? A client might ask for a specific Pantone color from their own Pantone swatch book. The designer sets the file exactly as it is required, yet when the client sees an example on their computer monitor they are very disappointed that the color isn’t the same or even close. Why is that?

Read more »

18
Nov

Preflight Tools in Adobe Acrobat

An introduction to the preflight tools in Adobe Acrobat Professional via Envision Print

This video was created with print buyers and print designers in mind. The tools and tips introduced will empower you to examine PDF files and identify some of the most common problems associated with them by identifying problems before you submit files to your printer.

There is always room for you to save valuable time and money.

29
Oct

Print-Ready PDF files

cmyk-dots

Print-ready PDF files Adobe’s Portable Document Format (PDF) is great for a multitude of uses. It has caused a revolution in printing. Everything needed for high-resolution printing can be packed into one file that can be opened and printed using Adobe’s free Reader on almost any computer. The trick is, because a PDF can be created many different ways, to create it the correct way and pack it with the essential information for high-quality digital printing or a file that can be used for make-ready, for offset printing.

Here are a few of the minimum requirements for a PDF file to be usable for high-resolution printing using a digital print process.

  • All fonts used in the document should be embedded in the PDF file. The preference for “Subsetting” the fonts should be set to 100%.
  • For CMYK printing, all color in the document should be CMYK. This goes for ink colors as well as photos and illustrations.
  • Make sure that the photos and line art in the document do not have their resolution reduced (downsampled) when the PDF is created. Photos should retain their 300 dpi resolution.
  • The compression should be fine set on “automatic” but some say “zip” is better than “jpeg” for quality. You can also choose “none” and the photos will not be compressed when the PDF is created but, this will result in a larger PDF.

If you follow these guidelines, your PDF will work for high-resolution CMYK printing. The same PDF will also work in all the processes that require less resolution as well.

The term “make-ready” refers to everything done on a press to prepare for the final print job. This includes selecting the proper colors, getting the image placement correct, setting up the plates, and preparing the printer for the chosen paper size and weight. Getting everything right during make-ready helps to ensure a quality print run. This step would be considered finished when the printer is satisfied with a print, and can therefore begin the actual run.