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Posts tagged ‘fonts’

16
Jun
font fail

Top 5 Fonts You Should Never Use

Ever think what fonts people use most?  Well, the point of the following video is, what fonts irritate people the most and how they make you look stupid. Before you click through, just imagine the fonts that you don’t want to see ever again, your guess might just be right! Read more »

5
May
Hyperactivitypography from A to Z

The confusions of Typography

I have recently stumbled upon this great book from a recent post by my friend Meagan. It made me start thinking about how typography has become a very confusing subject for designers the last couple of years. So many fonts, so little time. Here is a great book by Studio 3 that breaks down typography letter by letter in a fun way. Read more »

5
Jan
apple-sweetness

Typographical Portrait – Steve Jobs

The lord of all things Mac gets a typographical makeover with this Steve Jobs portrait by Dylan Roscover. The portrait was inspired by the Mac ads from the 90’s called “Crazy Ones”. Read more »

10
Dec
wordle

Have you ever Wordle?

Wordle is a toy for generating “word clouds” from text that you provide. The clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text. You can tweak your clouds with different fonts, layouts, and color schemes. My word cloud uses my blog tags that are popular topics. Read more »

24
Nov

Digital PrePress Checklist

Digital Prepress…the most complicated part of printing for both printers and designers alike. Common Problems: missing fonts, low resolution photos, files saved and packaged incorrectly. Oh my!

The next time you design a project and submit it to your local printer, take a peek at this list and your life and your printer’s job should be much easier! It might even be cheaper because your files were submitted correctly.

When creating documents to send for digital output, please ensure that:

  • The document dimensions are correct and at the right size for output.
  • All images are correctly positioned and linked.
  • Logos or graphics created in programs like Illustrator, have all type converted to paths or outlines.
  • In your page layout program, the status of all imported pictures or links should be “ok.”
  • You have only used fonts that you intended to use for output.
  • All unused colors have been deleted.
  • The pasteboard’s surrounding all design pages are empty.
  • All document bleeds have been extended at least 1/8″ beyond the desired finished size of your project.
  • All documents have been proof-read and double-checked before submission. Have a friend proof read it!

Design & Pre-Press Checklist:

  • Do not use Publisher or Quark. Stick to Adobe Products for ease of use.
  • Remember, Photoshop is for photos. Illustrator is for illustrations. InDesign is for Page Layout.
  • Do not enlarge images beyond 120% of original size when placing it in your document.
  • Do not use images downloaded from Google. Read second sections of post.
  • Do not use compression methods (i.e. LZW or JPEG) on placed images for output.
  • Do not use RGB images whenever possible. Convert them to CMYK.

Before submitting files, please make sure that you have included:

  • All fonts required to process and print the document.
  • All attached EPS and/or TIFF/JPG files.
  • Final laser prints of all document pages.
If all else fails, submit a PDF with appropriate bleeds and crop marks. Please reference Print-Ready PDF files for more information.
29
Oct

Print-Ready PDF files

cmyk-dots

Print-ready PDF files Adobe’s Portable Document Format (PDF) is great for a multitude of uses. It has caused a revolution in printing. Everything needed for high-resolution printing can be packed into one file that can be opened and printed using Adobe’s free Reader on almost any computer. The trick is, because a PDF can be created many different ways, to create it the correct way and pack it with the essential information for high-quality digital printing or a file that can be used for make-ready, for offset printing.

Here are a few of the minimum requirements for a PDF file to be usable for high-resolution printing using a digital print process.

  • All fonts used in the document should be embedded in the PDF file. The preference for “Subsetting” the fonts should be set to 100%.
  • For CMYK printing, all color in the document should be CMYK. This goes for ink colors as well as photos and illustrations.
  • Make sure that the photos and line art in the document do not have their resolution reduced (downsampled) when the PDF is created. Photos should retain their 300 dpi resolution.
  • The compression should be fine set on “automatic” but some say “zip” is better than “jpeg” for quality. You can also choose “none” and the photos will not be compressed when the PDF is created but, this will result in a larger PDF.

If you follow these guidelines, your PDF will work for high-resolution CMYK printing. The same PDF will also work in all the processes that require less resolution as well.

The term “make-ready” refers to everything done on a press to prepare for the final print job. This includes selecting the proper colors, getting the image placement correct, setting up the plates, and preparing the printer for the chosen paper size and weight. Getting everything right during make-ready helps to ensure a quality print run. This step would be considered finished when the printer is satisfied with a print, and can therefore begin the actual run.